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Attractions

In the northernmost reaches of Northern Ireland lies some of the most breathtaking scenery ever known.

From the spectacular nine Glens of Antrim to the Giants Causeway World heritage site and the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge; from the rugged coastline of Torr Head and Murlough Bay to the unsurpassed beauty of Rathlin Island; from the quiet charm of sleepy villages such as Bushmills, Ballintoy and Cushendun to the bustle of Ballycastle, a friendly market town - this region of Northern Ireland is famous the world over for its history, its legends and the genuine warmth of its hospitality. Here you'll enter a world of lush green forests, sweeping glens, rugged seascapes and sleepy villages; a land of tall tales of battling giants, princesses in peril and tragic, star crossed lovers.

Benone Strand

Limavady

Benone Beach, multiple recipient of the European Blue Flag and Seaside Award, is a must-see when visiting the area. With seven miles of golden sand and a magnificent back drop of mountain and cliff scenery and stunning views across to Donegal.

Bonamargy Friary

Ballycastle

Remains of Franciscan friary founded around 1500 by Rory MacQuillan. East range of cloister, gatehouse and church virtually complete except for roof. Open all year.

Torr Head

Ballycastle

This is possibly the most dramatic coastline in Ireland. Roadside fuchsia hedges towering ten feet high, dry stone walls, isolated hill farms and cliffs which tumble down to the Irish Sea where it meets the Atlantic.

Breen Oakwood Nature Reserve

Armoy, Ballymoney

At one time, Oakwoods covered much of North-East Antrim. Gradually, the trees were felled for timber and the land cleared for farming. Today, Breen Oakwood is one of the last fragments of these once extensive woodlands.

Rathlin Island Boathouse Visitor's Centre

Rathlin Island

Spend time in the Boathouse Visitor Centre for a dip into Rathlin's history. History, photographs, artefacts, books, guides and souvenirs for sale

Rough Fort

Limavady

Rough Fort, on the Limavady to Ballykelly road, is a remarkable earthwork construction over 1000 years old. Known as a rath, it was originally used as a defended farmstead into which livestock could be driven in the times of emergency.

Whitepark Bay, North Antrim Coast

Ballintoy, Ballycastle

The spectacular beach forms a white arc between two headlands on the North Antrim coast. In this secluded location, even on a busy day there is a refuge for quiet relaxation.

Tamlaght

Limavady

The ancient ruins of Tamlaght Finlagan Church and Graveyard are reputed to be the remains of an abbey founded by Columba in 575 AD. The remains of a Round Tower adjacent are said to have acted as a refuge from raiders.

Downhill Wood

Coleraine

There are a number of enjoyable walks and rare trees through 85 hectares of mixed woodland around a beautiful lake, whre you can take time to feed the ducks. The biggest Stitka Spruce in Ireland can also be found here.

Ballykelly Forest

Ballykelly, Limavady

Sited at Walworth is Northern Ireland's first state forest which includes a picnic area, walks and jogging trail. There are some 19th-century water mills at Carrickhugh.
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Carrick-a-rede Rope BridgeThe Giant's CausewayGlenarm Castle & Walled Garden

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